Author bio

Namita Gokhale

Namita Gokhale - book author

Namita Gokhale is the author of books: Things to leave behind, Paro: Dreams Of Passion, Travelling In, Travelling Out : A Book of Unexpected Journeys, Shakuntala, the Play of Memory, The Book of Shiva, A Himalayan Love Story, The Puffin Mahabharata, Gods, Graves and Grandmother, The Book of Shadows, The habit of love


Author books

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Title
Description
01
A rich, panoramic historical novel shows you Kumaon and the Raj as you have never seen them.

It is 1856, in picturesque Kumaon. History has already begun its steady march. Six native women clad in black and scarlet pichauras huddle around Naineetal Lake, attempting to cleanse it of threatening new influences. For, these are the days of Upper Mall Road (for Europeans and their horses) and Lower Mall Road (‘for dogs, servants and other Indians’). And this is the story of feisty young Tilottama Dutt, whose uncle hangs when he protests the reigning order—and her daughter, Deoki, who will confront change as Indians and as women.

Things to Leave Behind brings alive the romance of the mixed legacy of British-Indian past. Full of the fascinating backstory of Naineetal and its unwilling entry into Indian history, throwing a shining light on the elemental confusion of caste, creed and culture, illuminated with painstaking detail, here is a fascinating historical epic and Namita Gokhale’s most ambitious novel yet.
03
An essential traveller's companion This is an unusual collection of travel pieces by writers ranging from M.J. Akbar and Aman Nath to Devdutt Pattanaik, Jerry Pinto, Rahul Pandita and Advaita Kala.Featured here are essays on the changing face of the popular hill resort-Nainital, living as a Pakistani in the remote city of Copenhagen, a woman traveller being strip-searched at an American airport and traversing the dark interiors of the haunted Bhangarh Fort in Rajasthan, among others. Focusing on the Indian experience, the book captures a country of shifting landscapes - physical, cultural, psychological. A departure from the traditional travel narrative, this is a unique collection for the travel-book buff
05
Shiva: Destroyer and Protector, Supreme Ascetic and Lord of the Universe. He is Ardhanarishwara, half-man and half-woman; he is Neelakantha, who drank poison to save the three worlds-and yet, when crazed with grief at the death of Sati, set about destroying them. Shiva holds within him the answers to some of the greatest dilemmas that have perplexed mankind. Who is Shiva? Namita Gokhale examines this question and many others that lie within the myriad of stories about Shiva. Even as she unravels his complexities, she finds a philosophy and worldview that is terrifying and yet life affirming-an outlook that is to many the essence of Indian thought.
06
With this haunting novel about romantic loss and fatalism, Namita Gokhale confirms her reputation as one of India's finest writers, and one with the rare gift of seeing and recording the epic in ordinary lives. This is the story of Parvati, young, beautiful and doomed, and Mukul Nainwal, the local boy made good who returns to the Nainital of his youth to search for the only woman he has ever loved. Told in the voices of these two exiles from life, this spare, sensitive book is a compelling read.
07
'A long, long time ago, in the ancient lands of India, known in those days as Bharatvarsha, a family quarrel grew into a bloody war. There had been wars before, and there have been wars since, but that mighty battle between warring cousins of the Kuru clan has become a part of the mythology and history of India. Told and retold a million times, the story of the Mahabharata is about defeat as much as victory, about humility as much as courage. It is the greatest story ever told.'

Like a modern-day suta or storyteller, Namita Gokhale brings alive India's richest literary treasure with disarming ease and simplicity. She retells this timeless tale of mortals and immortals and stories within stories, of valour, deceit, glory and despair, for today's young reader in a clear, contemporary style.

A brilliant series of evocative and thoughtful illustrations by painter and animator Suddhasattwa Basu brings the epic to life in a vibrant visual feast.

Matchless in its content and presentation, The Puffin Mahabharata is a book that will be cherished by readers of all ages.
08
“Before mother left, in a long-ago time, we had been very rich. My grandmother had been a great singer, a Kothewali whose voice was more liquid and beautiful than Lata Mangeshkar’s. Eleven Nawabs and two Englishmen were besotted with love of her.”

From these great heights, Gudiya’s world plunges into the depths of almost complete penury when she arrives in Delhi with her ancient grandmother, Ammi, fleeing small-town scandal and disgrace. Just when all seems lost, Ammi works a miracle: a slab of green marble stolen from a building site, and five rounded pebbles from a sahib's garden, are transformed by the power of her singing voice into an inviolable place of worship. From here on, Gudiya s life takes on an extraordinary momentum of its own. Ammi dies a small-time saint, Pandit Kailash Nath Shastri predicts a future of impossible luck, the irrepressible Phoolwati becomes an unlikely guardian, and the inhumanly handsome Kalki rides in on his white horse and steals her heart. As we follow the twists and turns of Gudiya s story, we see unfold before us the peculiar dance of chance and will that is human existence.
09
Bitiya is a young university lecturer in Delhi whose external beauty has been destroyed in an acid attack. Unable to bear the pain of her scars or the pity of others, she leaves for the hills of the Himalayas and becomes transfixed by the voices that sing from the foundations of her new home.
10
Collection of stories offering a profound insight into the female mind!

The Habit of Love is a collection of stories about the inner lives of women. Some of these women inhabit the ancient past, some the present day but they share the whimsical humour with which they speak of themselves. Journalist Madhu Sinha strikes up a friendship with a young man the same age as her indifferent children; a messenger swan relates the story of the doomed lovers Nala and Damayanti; Vatsala Vidyarthi suspects her one night stand of stealing her money. Delicately poised between irony and grief, The Habit of Love is both elegant and acute, arch and melancholic. In these moving stories she displays both sympathy and understanding as she unveils the workings of a woman s heart.