Author bio

Michael J. Nelson

Michael J. Nelson - book author

Michael J. Nelson is an actor, writer, director, and musician who served as head writer for ten seasons, and on-air host for five seasons, of the television series Mystery Science Theater 3000. He was also the composer of most of MST3K's original music, and is coauthor of The Mystery Science Theater 3000 Amazing Colossal Episode Guide (1996).

Michael J. Nelson is the author of books: Mike Nelson's Movie Megacheese, Mike Nelson's Mind over Matters, Mike Nelson's Death Rat!, Happy Kitty Bunny Pony: A Saccharine Mouthful of Super Cute, Goth-Icky: A Macabre Menagerie of Morbid Monstrosities, Love Sick: A Smoldering Look at Love, Lust, and Marriage, Fluffy Humpy Poopy Puppy: A Ruff, Dog-Eared Look at Man's Best Friend, The Mystery Science Theater 3000: Amazing Colossal Episode Guide, Black and Blue: How African Americans Judge the U.S. Legal System


Author books

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Title
Description
01
You might think that after ten seasons on the Peabody Award-winning TV series Mystery Science Theater 3000, Mike Nelson has seen enough bad movies for one lifetime. As the guys at Cahiers du Cinema say, au contraire! Hollywood's spigot of stupidity shows no sign of slowing, and cheesy films continue to flood our multiplexes and gunk up our home entertainment centers at an alarming rate. This dire situation calls for a specialist. A professional. An expert in wading through motion pictures so vile that they aren't released; they escape. We need Mike Nelson! Hey, settle down there, pal--you got him!

In more than sixty laugh-out-loud reviews and essays featuring his unique combination of erudite wit and shameless clowning, this screenscarred veteran takes us deep into the recesses of cinematic cheese. He examines legendary showbiz families like Culkin, Baldwin, and Estevez; uncovers an ancient quatrain in which Nostradamus foretells the coming of David Hasselhoff; makes the case for the Food Network and the Three Stooges; and skewers all kinds of movies, including Lost in Space, Twister, Anaconda, The Postman, Spring Break, My Best Friend's Wedding, The Bridges of Madison County, The Blair Witch Project, and many, many more. Here is a film critic for the rest of us: the outrageous, hilarious Mike Nelson.
02
Why do some people retain cute baby-talk names for their relatives (like "Num-Num" and "Pee-Paw") well into middle age? How should a reasonable person respond when Olivia Newton-John sings, "Have you never been mellow?" Who's responsible for the sorry state of men's fashion, and is it the same guy who invented the jerkin? Is there any future in being a Midwesterner? Can you really enjoy your lunch when the restaurant is decorated to look like an African plain? How come women keep dozens of bottles and jars of moisturizers, unguents, and lotions around -- all of them half empty?

In more than 50 hilarious all-new essays, one of America's brightest young humorists -- the head writer and on-air host of the legendary TV series Mystery Science Theater 3000 -- finds the fun in all aspects of the human condition, no matter how absurd. Join Mike Nelson on an angst-filled visit to a health spa; shopping sessions at Home Depot and Radio Shack; adventures in the very amateur musical theater; a gut-busting discourse on the history of television; ruminations on his roles as husband, father, and citizen; and much, much more.
03
What if an aging, unsuccessful Minnesota author of history books with names like Old von Steuben Had a Farm: The German-American Settlement of the Midwest decided he could write a book every bit as vapid and ridiculous as the books that sold four hundred times more copies than his own? Well, he would write Death Rat, of course, the thrilling tale of a man who battles prejudice, his inner demons, and a cunning six-foot-long rat.

And what if he was told by publishers that, at sixty years of age, though his book was a thrilling read, he just didn’t look the part of a virile writer of gripping adventure books featuring cunning six-foot-long rats? Well, he would cook up a scheme so outrageous, it would incur the wrath of Gus Bromstad, the beloved author of the homespun Dogwood Downs series of books. And it would stir up the bizarre religious fervor of King Leo, the libidinous funk superstar whose CD “LoveDeathTomorrowJelly” was one of the biggest sellers of the decade. And it would throw him into a strange symbiotic relationship with the entire town of Holey, Minnesota, population 38.

Such is the fate of one Pontius Feeb, the hapless author of Death Rat. . . and perhaps the fate of all who attempt to write gripping novels featuring cunning six-foot-long rats.
04
From turn-of-the-century novelties and Depression-era distraction, through wartime comfort, to Hello Kitty and Jeff Koons, cuteness has thrived in the fertile soil of modern media and pop culture. This work celebrates the 'cult of the cute'. It is a testament to our fascination with cute things.
05
From Jekyll and Hyde to B horror movie icons to the Addams family and beyond, macabre misfits have thrived in the fertile soil of modern-age media and pop culture. What is it about vampires, zombies, skeletons, and other mutants brought to life in the darkest recesses of the imagination? Goth-Icky celebrates modern-day goths, their culture, and the morbid monstrosities that inspire them. Containing over 200 images from the print and advertising archives of the Charles S. Anderson Design Company in combination with a hilarious text by the legendary Michael J. Nelson, this book is an amazingly rich and weird testament to the pervasiveness of goth aesthetics, the appeal of kitsch, and our love of horror.
06
From the bodice-busting covers of Harlequin romances to personal ads to wedding cake toppers, romantic subjects have thrived in the fertile soil of American modern-age media and pop culture. Brought to Abrams by the creators of the successful Happy Kitty Bunny Pony: A Saccharine Mouthful of Super Cute, Love Sick celebrates the many facets of love: dating, marriage, heartbreak, sex, and strange, thin men in shorts with funny socks!

Containing more than 200 images from the print and advertising archives of Charles S. Anderson Design Company in combination with a sharply hilarious text by Michael J. Nelson, the main writer and host of the legendary Mystery Science Theater 3000, Love Sick is a steamy, kitsch, and campy testament to America's love of LOVE. So grab a cozy spot by the fire, snuggle up with the one you love, and see if either of you recognizes yourself in Love Sick.
07
From Toto to Lassie to Benji and beyond, the dog has thrived in the soil of modern-age media and pop culture. Containing over 200 images, this book serves as a tribute to man's oldest and smelliest friends.
08
What is the mystery of Mystery Science Theater 3000?You may have asked yourself, "What the heck are these talking shadows doing inthe corner of my TV screen, riffing away with plucky--and hilarious--abandon inthe face of some really bad movies?" Or something similar. The answer, myfriend, is right in this here official, 100%-MST3K-sanctioned book.

Or maybe you know all about the adventures of Joel, Mike, and the 'bots in thenot-too distant future. Then you can skip those pages. Really. We won'ttell. You still need this book. Because it's got more cool stuff from thewriters and performers of MST3K.

More of what you'll find in the "Mystery Science Theater 3000 AmazingColossal Episode Guide"

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09
The American legal system is experiencing a period of extreme stress, if not crisis, as it seems to be losing its legitimacy with at least some segments of its constituency. Nowhere is this legitimacy deficit more apparent than in a portion of the African American community in the U.S., as incidents of police killing black suspects - whether legally justified or not - have become almost routine. However, this legitimacy deficit has largely been documented through anecdotal evidence and a steady drumbeat of journalistic reports, not rigorous scientific research. This book offers an all-inclusive account of how and why African Americans differ in their willingness to ascribe legitimacy to legal institutions, as well as in their willingness to accept the policy decisions those institutions promulgate.

Based on two nationally-representative samples of African Americans, this book ties together four dominant theories of public opinion: Legitimacy Theory, Social Identity Theory, theories of adulthood political socialization and learning through experience, and information processing theories. The findings reveal a gaping chasm in legal legitimacy between black and white Americans. More importantly, black people themselves differ in their perceptions of legal legitimacy. Group identities and experiences with legal authorities play a crucial role in shaping whether and how black people extend legitimacy to the legal institutions that so much affect them.

This book is one of the most comprehensive analyses produced to date of legal legitimacy within the American black community, with many surprising and counter-intuitive results.