Author bio

Donald Ervin Knuth

Donald Ervin Knuth - book author

Donald Ervin Knuth, born January 10th 1938, is a renowned computer scientist and Professor Emeritus of the Art of Computer Programming at Stanford University.

Author of the seminal multi-volume work The Art of Computer Programming ("TAOCP"), Knuth has been called the "father" of the analysis of algorithms, contributing to the development of, and systematizing formal mathematical techniques for, the rigorous analysis of the computational complexity of algorithms, and in the process popularizing asymptotic notation.

In addition to fundamental contributions in several branches of theoretical computer science, Knuth is the creator of the TeX computer typesetting system, the related METAFONT font definition language and rendering system, and the Computer Modern family of typefaces.

A prolific writer and scholar, Knuth created the WEB/CWEB computer programming systems designed to encourage and facilitate literate programming, and designed the MMIX instruction set architecture.

Donald Ervin Knuth is the author of books: The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 1: Fundamental Algorithms, The Art of Computer Programming, Volumes 1-3 Boxed Set, The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 2: Seminumerical Algorithms, The Art of Computer Programming: Volume 3: Sorting and Searching, Surreal Numbers, The Art of Computer Programming, Volumes 1-4a Boxed Set, Things a Computer Scientist Rarely Talks About, Computers & Typesetting, Volume A: The TeXBook, 3:16 - Bible Texts Illuminated, Literate Programming


Author books

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Title
Description
01
The first revision of this third volume is the most comprehensivesurvey of classical computer techniques for sorting and searching. It extends thetreatment of data structures in Volume 1 to consider both large and smalldatabases and internal and external memories. The book contains a selection ofcarefully checked computer methods, with a quantitative analysis of theirefficiency. Outstanding features of the second edition include a revised sectionon optimum sorting and new discussions of the theory of permutations and ofuniversal hashing.
02
Knuth's classic work has been widely acclaimed as one of the most influential works in the field of computer science. For the first time, these books are available as a boxed, three-volume set. The handsome slipcase makes this set an ideal gift for the recent computer science graduate or professional programmer. Offering a description of classical computer science, this multi-volume work is a useful resource in programming theory and practice for students, researchers, and practitioners alike. For programmers, it offers cookbook solutions to their day-to-day problems.
03
The bible of all fundamental algorithms and the work that taught many of today's software developers most of what they know about computer programming. -Byte, September 1995 I can't begin to tell you how many pleasurable hours of study and recreation they have afforded me! I have pored over them in cars, restaurants, at work, at home... and even at a Little League game when my son wasn't in the line-up. -Charles Long If you think you're a really good programmer... read [Knuth's] Art of Computer Programming... You should definitely send me a resume if you can read the whole thing. -Bill Gates It's always a pleasure when a problem is hard enough that you have to get the Knuths off the shelf. I find that merely opening one has a very useful terrorizing effect on computers. -Jonathan Laventhol The second volume offers a complete introduction to the field of seminumerical algorithms, with separate chapters on random numbers and arithmetic. The book summarizes the major paradigms and basic theory of such algorithms, thereby providing a comprehensive interface between computer programming and numerical analysis. Particularly noteworthy in this third edition is Knuth's new treatment of random number generators, and his discussion of calculations with formal power series.
Ebook (PDF version) produced by Mathematical Sciences Publishers (MSP), http: //msp.org
04
The first revision of this third volume is the most comprehensivesurvey of classical computer techniques for sorting and searching. It extends thetreatment of data structures in Volume 1 to consider both large and smalldatabases and internal and external memories. The book contains a selection ofcarefully checked computer methods, with a quantitative analysis of theirefficiency. Outstanding features of the second edition include a revised sectionon optimum sorting and new discussions of the theory of permutations and ofuniversal hashing.
05
Shows how a young couple turned on to pure mathematics and found total happiness. This title is intended for those who might enjoy an engaging dialogue on abstract mathematical ideas, and those who might wish to experience how new mathematics is created.
06
"The bible of all fundamental algorithms and the work that taught many of today's software developers most of what they know about computer programming.""--Byte," September 1995 Countless readers have spoken about the profound personal influence of Knuth's work. Scientists have marveled at the beauty and elegance of his analysis, while ordinary programmers have successfully applied his "cookbook" solutions to their day-to-day problems. All have admired Knuth for the breadth, clarity, accuracy, and good humor found in his books. "I can't begin to tell you how many pleasurable hours of study and recreation they have afforded me I have pored over them in cars, restaurants, at work, at home... and even at a Little League game when my son wasn't in the line-up.""--"Charles Long Primarily written as a reference, some people have nevertheless found it possible and interesting to read each volume from beginning to end. A programmer in China even compared the experience to reading a poem. "If you think you're a really good programmer... read Knuth's] "Art of Computer Programming.".. You should definitely send me a resume if you can read the whole thing.""--"Bill Gates Whatever your background, if you need to do any serious computer programming, you will find your own good reason to make each volume in this series a readily accessible part of your scholarly or professional library. "It's always a pleasure when a problem is hard enough that you have to get the Knuths off the shelf. I find that merely opening one has a very useful terrorizing effect on computers.""--"Jonathan Laventhol
In describing the new fourth volume, one reviewer listed the qualities that distinguish all of Knuth's work.
In sum: ] "detailed coverage of the basics, illustrated with well-chosen examples; occasional forays into more esoteric topics and problems at the frontiers of research; impeccable writing peppered with occasional bits of humor; extensive collections of exercises, all with solutions or helpful hints; a careful attention to history; implementations of many of the algorithms in his classic step-by-step form."
--Frank Ruskey
These four books comprise what easily could be the most important set of information on any serious programmer's bookshelf.
07
How does a computer scientist understand infinity? What can probability theory teach us about free will? Can mathematical notions be used to enhance one's personal understanding of the Bible?

Perhaps no one is more qualified to address these questions than Donald E. Knuth, whose massive contributions to computing have led others to nickname him "The Father of Computer Science"—and whose religious faith led him to understand a fascinating analysis of the Bible called the 3:16 project. In this series of six spirited, informal lectures, Knuth explores the relationships between his vocation and his faith, revealing the unique perspective that his work with computing has lent to his understanding of God.

His starting point is the 3:16 project, an application of mathematical "random sampling" to the books of the Bible. The first lectures tell the story of the project's conception and execution, exploring its many dimensions of language translation, aesthetics, and theological history. Along the way, Knuth explains the many insights he gained from such interdisciplinary work. These theological musings culminate in a surprising final lecture tackling the ideas of infinity, free will, and some of the other big questions that lie at the juncture of theology and computation.

Things a Computer Scientist Rarely Talks About, with its charming and user-friendly format—each lecture ends with a question and answer exchange, and the book itself contains more than 100 illustrations—is a readable and intriguing approach to a crucial topic, certain to edify both those who are serious and curious about their faiths and those who look at the science of computation and wonder what it might teach them about their spiritual world.

Includes "Creativity, Spirituality, and Computer Science," a panel discussion featuring Harry Lewis, Guy L. Steele, Jr., Manuela Veloso, Donald E. Knuth, and Mitch Kapor.
08
TeX represents the state-of-the-art in computer typesetting. It is particularly valuable where the document, article, or book to be produced contains a lot of mathematics, and where the user is concerned about typographic quality. TeX software offers both writers and publishers the opportunity to produce technical text of all kinds, in an attractive form, with the speed and efficiency of a computer system.

Novice and expert users alike will gain from The TeXbook the level of information they seek. Knuth warns newcomers away from the more difficult areas, while he entices experienced users with new challenges. The novice need not learn much about TeX to prepare a simple manuscript with it. But for the preparation of more complex documents, The TeXbook contains all the detail required.

Knuth’s familiar wit, and illustrations specially drawn by Duane Bibby, add a light touch to an unusually readable software manual.
The TeXbook is the first in a five-volume series on Computers and Typesetting, all authored by Knuth.
10
This anthology of essays from Donald Knuth, "the father of computer science," and the inventor of literate programming includes early essays on related topics such as structured programming, as well as The Computer Journal article that launched literate programming itself. Many examples are given, including excerpts from the programs for TeX and METAFONT. The final essay is an example of CWEB, a system for literate programming in C and related languages.

This volume is first in a series of Knuth's collected works.